Catrin Moore

Lead the Oxford Global Burden of Disease (GBD) group on the Global Research on AntiMicrobial resistance (GRAM) project - Big Data Institute

Dr. Catrin Moore’s research focuses on Antimicrobial resistance, often termed the silent pandemic, which is on the increase in many LMICs. Dr. Moore was based at the University of Oxford for over twenty years in the Global arena, and her DPhiL was based in Oxford and Thailand. She moved to South East Asia following her DPhiL to build the local capacity in-country and ran diagnostic and research clinical microbiology laboratories for six years (based in Laos and Cambodia). 

Dr. Moore joined the Big Data Institute in May 2018, where she lead the Oxford Global Burden of Disease (GBD) group on the Global Research on AntiMicrobial resistance (GRAM) project. Partnered with the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) in Seattle and Tropical Medicine in Oxford, they analysed global data to produce health metrics and geospatial maps on antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Utilizing methodologies applied in IHME’s ongoing Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study, the partnership builds global evidence on AMR with an initial focus on a select number of disease-resistant infections. Dr. Moore will move across to St. Georges University of London, taking the experience from GRAM and moving towards working with local researchers where there are high burdens of AMR. In the new Antimicrobial Resistance, Prescribing, and Consumption Data to Inform Country Antibiotic Guidance and Local Action (ADILA) project we will work closely with local researchers to inform prescribing based on local information. Dr Moore seeks to improve the use of diagnostic tools, training, and communication in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) to treat patients presenting to primary care facilities to reduce the unnecessary prescribing of antibiotics,. Dr Moore is a member of the advisory group on the WHO panel for critically important antibiotics for human medicine and is a mentor on the Fleming Fund Fellowship programme.

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